Tag Archive: release

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission – 2013 Annual Report to Congress

The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC) was “created by the United States Congress in October 2000 with the legislative mandate to monitor, investigate, and submit to Congress an annual report on the national security implications of the bilateral trade and economic relationship between the United States and the People’s Republic of China, and to provide recommendations, where appropriate, to Congress for legislative and administrative action.

On November 20, 2013, the USCC released its 2013 annual report to congress. Chapter 3, Section 2 of the report contains analysis on Taiwan, including discussions on cross-Strait relations, Taiwan’s role in the East and South China Sea disputes, and the status of U.S.-Taiwan relations. The report also contains extensive discussion on cross-Strait military and security issues.

Complete Report (PDF, 15MB)
Chapter 3, Section 2: Taiwan (PDF, 1.1MB)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/u-s-china-economic-and-security-review-commission-2013-annual-report-to-congress/

New Report Examines the History and Implications of Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales

On April 17, 2012, the US-Taiwan Business Council and the Project 2049 Institute will release a joint report entitled “Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales.” This report takes an in-depth look into the history of major U.S. arms sales to Taiwan, and examines the correlation between such arms sales and the reactions and subsequent retaliatory responses – if any – by the People’s Republic of China.

The report questions the extent to which China is prepared to jeopardize its overall relationship with America, and concludes that while the PRC has loudly protested past arms sales, tangible retaliatory responses have not had substantial long-term effects. China is unlikely to challenge any fundamental U.S. interests in response to future releases of significant military articles or services to Taiwan, and the U.S. therefore retains considerable freedom of action in abiding by the Taiwan Relations Act. Barring a substantive reduction in the Chinese military posture opposite Taiwan, the U.S. will likely continue to provide Taiwan with weapons of a defensive character for the foreseeable future.

The report also asserts that U.S. arms sales provide Taiwan’s government with the confidence needed to engage with their counterparts in Beijing from a position of strength, suggests that these sales are in the U.S. national interest, and that they serve as a visible reminder of U.S. commitments to peace and security in the Asia Pacific.

 

New Report Examines the History and Implications of Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales (PDF file)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/new-report-examines-the-history-and-implications-of-chinese-reactions-to-taiwan-arms-sales/

April 17, 2012 – Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales: Report Release & Panel Discussion

Event:
Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales
Report Release & Panel Discussion

April 17, 2012
2:30pm – 4:00pm

Report Cover: Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales

Report Cover: Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales

The US-Taiwan Business Council and the Project 2049 Institute have jointly produced a report – entitled “Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales” – that examines the history of major U.S. arms sales to Taiwan since 1979, and discusses the correlation between such arms sales and Chinese reactions and retaliatory responses – if any. In addition to acting as the release event for the report, the panel discussion will examine the contents and conclusions of the report, and we will also discuss implications for future U.S. arms sales to Taiwan.

Panelists:

Rupert Hammond-Chambers, President, US-Taiwan Business Council
Randall Schriver, President and CEO, Project 2049 Institute

Location:

U.S. Capitol Visitor Center, Room SVC 209
Washington, D.C.

Note that the entrance is located on 1st Street NE & East Capitol Street. Please arrive early, allowing for sufficient time to pass through security screening.

Registration:

www.us-taiwan.org
(703) 465-2930

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/april-17-2012-launch-event-for-report/

Senator Cornyn and Secretary Clinton Make Taiwan F-16 Deal

Secretary Clinton today informed Senator John Cornyn – who had been blocking the Senate confirmation of the Deputy Secretary of State nominee to motivate the Administration to accept Taiwan’s Letter of Request for new F-16s – that the Obama Administration would make a decision on the F-16 sale, as well as deliver a long delayed Taiwan Airpower Report, by October 1, 2011. On that basis, Senator Cornyn lifted his hold on the nomination of Bill Burns, and awaits the Administration’s announcement and its submission of the report.

While the US-Taiwan Business Council welcomes the Obama Administration’s commitment to finally make a decision, we suspect that the outcome simply reiterates decisions already made, and therefore fails to address Taiwan’s central need – new combat aircraft to meet the growing threat from China.

 

Press Note: Senator Cornyn and Secretary Clinton Make Taiwan F-16 Deal (PDF file)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/senator-cornyn-and-secretary-clinton-make-taiwan-f-16-deal/

U.S. Senate Sends President Obama Strong Message on New F-16s for Taiwan

The US-Taiwan Business Council welcomes the May 26, 2011 letter to President Obama, urging him to “move quickly to notify Congress of the sale of 66 F-16C/D aircraft that Taiwan needs in order to modernize its air force.” The letter came from Senators Robert Menendez and James Inhofe, joined by 43 of their U.S. Senate colleagues.

The letter notes that ”successive reports issued by U.S. and Taiwanese defense authorities clearly outline the direct threat faced by Taiwan as a result of China’s unprecedented military buildup,” and that “military experts in both Taiwan and the United States have raised concerns that Taiwan is losing the qualitative advantage in defensive arms that has long served as its primary military deterrent against China.” The letter goes on to say that “without new fighter aircraft and upgrades to its existing fleet of F-16s, Taiwan will be dangerously exposed to Chinese military threats, aggression and provocation, which pose significant national security implications for the United States.

Commenting on the letter, Council President Rupert Hammond-Chambers said, “The Obama Administration has just hosted PLA Chief of Staff Chen Bingde, who made several unsubstantiated claims concerning Taiwan during his visit – including that some on Capitol Hill are considering reviewing the need for the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA). Senators Menendez and Inhofe and their 43 Senate colleagues are clearly and concisely responding to General Chen’s claims. The United States Congress remains firmly in support of the Taiwan Relations Act, and of its requirement to provide Taiwan with arms to provide for its own self-defense.”

 

U.S. Senate Sends President Obama Strong Message on New F-16s for Taiwan (PDF file)
Senators Menendez and Inhofe May 26, 2011 Letter to President Obama on F-16s for Taiwan

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/us-senate-sends-president-obama-strong-message-on-new-f-16s-for-taiwan/

US-Taiwan Business Council Supports Senator Richard Lugar’s Concerns Over Taiwan’s Deteriorating Airpower Situation

In a letter dated April 1, 2011, Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Senator Richard Lugar (R-IN) wrote to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on the issue of U.S. defense equipment sales to Taiwan. The US-Taiwan Business Council shares Senator Lugar’s expressed concerns over Taiwan’s deteriorating airpower situation, and supports his contention that replacement of Taiwan’s tactical aircraft – such as with U.S.-made F-16C/Ds – is both necessary, justified, and not provocative.

In the letter, Senator Lugar wrote “Given the decrepit state of Taiwan’s F-5s, the service life issues associated with its IDF [Indigenous Defense Fighter], and a growing problem … obtaining affordable and sustainable access to spare parts for Mirages, I am very concerned that if the Administration does not act favorably on Taiwan’s outstanding Letter of Request (LOR) for sales of F-16C/D aircraft, Taiwan will be forced to retire all of its existing F-16A/B aircraft in the next decade, leaving it with no credible air-to-air capability.”

The Council also shares Senator Lugar’s concern over the tenuous nature of Taiwan’s present fighter fleet and its urgent requirement to retire obsolete F-5 and Mirage airframes, to upgrade F-16A/Bs and IDFs, and to procure new F-16C/Ds to replace retiring aircraft. Taiwan has a legitimate requirement to maintain a credible air deterrent in the face of a growing military threat from China – a threat that, to-date, has not been adequately discussed nor responded to by the Obama Administration.

 

US-Taiwan Business Council Supports Senator Richard Lugar’s Concerns Over Taiwan’s Deteriorating Airpower Situation (PDF file)
Senator Lugar Letter on F-16s

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/council-supports-senator-richard-lugars-concerns-over-taiwans-deteriorating-airpower-situation/

May 11, 2010 – The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait: Report Release & Panel Discussion

Event:
The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait
Report Release & Panel Discussion

May 11, 2010
10:30am – 12:30pm

Report Cover: The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait

Report Cover: The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait

In a report dated January 21, 2010, the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) submitted to Congress an assessment of the current state of Taiwan’s air defense forces, their ability to defend Taiwan’s air space, and possible measures that Taiwan could undertake to strengthen its air defense. The DoD analysis was written under guidelines laid out in the National Defense Authorization Act 2010. However, the bulk of the DoD analysis on this matter is classified.

The US-Taiwan Business Council has produced its own independent analysis report – entitled “The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait” – to examine these questions and to provide a detailed public assessment of the issues. This event and seminar will allow for an open and active discussion of the report and its contents.

Moderator:

Rupert Hammond-Chambers, President, US-Taiwan Business Council

Speakers:

Fu Mei, Director, Taiwan Security Analysis Center
Richard Fisher, Senior Fellow, Asian Military Affairs, International Assessment & Strategy Center

Location:

U.S. Capitol Visitor Center, Room SVC 203/202
Washington, D.C.

Note that the entrance is located on 1st Street NE & East Capitol Street. Please arrive early, allowing for sufficient time to pass through security screening.

Registration:

www.us-taiwan.org
(703) 465-2930

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/may-11-2010-the-balance-of-air-power-in-the-taiwan-strait-report-release-panel-discussion/

US-Taiwan Business Council to Release Independent Analysis Report on The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait

On May 11, 2010, at a public seminar on Capitol Hill, the US-Taiwan Business Council will release a report entitled “The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait”. This report provides a detailed examination of Taiwan’s major air defense requirements, and was written to conform to the 2009 Congressional directive instructing the U.S. Department of Defense to prepare an assessment of Taiwan’s current air defense capabilities.

The Council’s report discusses Taiwan’s need to address the burgeoning cross-Strait fighter gap; to undertake a mid-life upgrade of its existing F-16s and Indigenous Defense Fighters; to invest further in modernizing its ground-based air defenses; to continue the force-multiplier effect of investments in modern, balanced and integrated intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities; and to increase investments in Electronic Warfare and Information Warfare.

This analysis report also examines the potential impact on U.S. forces if Taiwan can not defend its own airspace. The Taiwan Relations Act (TRA) notes that the U.S. is required, “to maintain the capacity of the United States to resist any resort to force.” Should the U.S. decide not to provide Taiwan with the equipment it needs, it would lead to a degrading of Taiwan’s military strength. Given that American forces in Asia are already stretched thin, the report asks what impact such an outcome would have on American readiness, and questions where the additional forces would come from to fill the gap.

 

US-Taiwan Business Council to Release Independent Analysis Report on “The Balance of Air Power in the Taiwan Strait” (PDF file)

Permanent link to this article: http://www.ustaiwandefense.com/us-taiwan-business-council-to-release-independent-analysis-report-on-the-balance-of-air-power-in-the-taiwan-strait/