Tag Archive: information

Taiwan Ministry of National Defense (MND) Reports

 

Taiwan’s Ministry of National Defense (MND) occasionally publishes reports on the status of the military and national security in Taiwan.

Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR)

The Amendment to Article 31 of the National Defense Act passed by the Legislative Yuan on July 17, 2008 mandates the MND to submit a Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) within ten months after every new president takes office in order to review and confirm defense strategy and military strategy, and provide a vision for future development.

The Taiwan Quadrennial Defense Review website is located at http://www.mnd.gov.tw

Quadrennial Defense Review 2009

Published in March, 2009

Quadrennial Defense Review 2013

Published in March, 2013

Quadrennial Defense Review 2017

Published in March, 2017

National Defense Report

The Ministry of National Defense is obligated to periodically report “what it has done, what it is doing, what it prepares to do, why it is going to do so” to the people in accordance with Article 30 of the National Defense Act. The National Defense Report is published to give citizens a better understanding of the nation’s current security environment and national defense policy.

The Taiwan National Defense Report website is located at http://www.mnd.gov.tw

National Defense Report 2002

Published July, 2002

National Defense Report 2008

Published May 13, 2008

National Defense Report 2011

Published August 22, 2011

National Defense Report 2013

Published October, 2013

National Defense Report 2015

Published October, 2015

For the Chinese language version, see http://www.mnd.gov.tw

 

 

Additional versions of these reports are also available at the Thinking Taiwan “Complete Collection of Taiwan’s Defence Policy Documents” page.

 

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The DPP’s National Defense Agenda

DPP’s  Defense  Agenda

 

On May 26, 2015 the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) think tank New Frontier Foundation released four “blue papers” covering the DPP’s national defense agenda. (Press Conference)

The first of these papers (Defense Policy Blue Paper 9) has been completely translated into English, but in the remaining reports only the forewords have been translated. Forewords are written by DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen.

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 9 – Taiwan’s Military Capacities in 2025

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 10 – Information Protection and Strategic Communications

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 11 – Refinement of Veteran Affairs

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 12 – Preparing the Development of Indigenous Defense Industry

 


 

On December 5, 2014, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) think tank New Frontier Foundation released its eight “blue paper” covering the DPP’s national defense agenda.

Titled “Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief,” the paper calls for the Taiwan armed forces to expand their role and mission in order to improve military effectiveness in contingencies other than war.

English language foreword by DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen

Report Announcement

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 8 – Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

 


 

On October 6, 2014, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) think tank New Frontier Foundation released its seventh “blue paper” covering the DPP’s national defense agenda.

Titled “Bolstering Taiwan’s Core Defense Industries,” the paper calls for reviving the domestic defense industry, with the goal of elevating Taiwan’s capacity to produce its own defensive equipment and weaponry.

English language foreword by DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen

Report Announcement

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 7 – Bolstering Taiwan’s Core Defense Industries

 


 

On August 22, 2014, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) think tank New Frontier Foundation released its sixth “blue paper” covering the DPP’s national defense agenda.

Titled “New Generation of Soldiers,” the paper calls for initiating reform of internal military affairs with personnel considerations as a core value, and strengthening the connection between the military and society.

English language foreword by DPP Chairwoman Tsai Ing-wen

Report Announcement

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 6 – New Generation of Soldiers

 


 

On March 3, 2014, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) think tank New Frontier Foundation released its fifth “blue paper” covering the DPP’s national defense agenda.

In announcing the report, DPP Chairman Su Tseng-chang firmly stressed the need for Taiwan to pursue stronger defense capabilities. He stated that the DPP will take full responsibility of becoming the catalyst for strengthening national defenses by encouraging indigenous defense production, especially for submarine capabilities. He also stated that Taiwan must “promptly adjust its national defense strategy, military strategy, and operational concepts” to meet growing Chinese military threats and “establish Taiwan’s self-defense capability.”

The report itself stated that Taiwan should focus on fostering private investment in indigenous R&D, next-generation weapons, and cyber warfare.

Both the Chinese and English versions have been compiled into one document (the English translation begins on page 37).

Report Announcement

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 5 – China’s Military Threats against Taiwan in 2025

 


 

On June 6, 2013 the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) think tank New Frontier Foundation released four “blue papers” covering the DPP’s national defense agenda. (Press Conference, Report Announcement)

The first report covers the overall strategy and philosophy behind the DPP’s national defense policy. The second report covers recommendations on transforming the quasi-governmental Chungshan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST), and on strengthening the nation’s military-industrial and research capabilities. The third report covers recommendations for Taiwan’s National Security Council (NSC), while the fourth outlines the DPP’s plans to strengthen military cooperation between Taiwan and the United States.

The first paper has been completely translated into English, but in the remaining reports only the forewords have been translated.

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 1 – DPP’s  Defense  Agenda

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 2 – Transforming  the  CSIST: Strengthening Indigenous Defense Research and Development

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 3 – An Accountable National Security Council

DPP Defense Policy Blue Paper 4 – New Chapter for Taiwan‐U.S. Defense Partnership

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2015 – Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China

The U.S. Department of Defense has released its annual report to Congress on the military power of China. 2015 – Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China (PDF)

One major section (beginning on page 56) is called Force Modernization for a Taiwan Contingency.

 

Security in the Taiwan Strait is largely a function of dynamic interactions between and among mainland China, Taiwan, and the United States. China’s strategy toward Taiwan has been influenced by what it sees as positive developments in Taiwan’s political situation and approach to engagement with China. However, China’s overall strategy continues to incorporate elements of persuasion and coercion to deter or repress the development of political attitudes in Taiwan favoring independence.

China and Taiwan have made progress in expanding cross-Strait trade/economic links and people-to-people contacts. Alongside positive public statements about the Taiwan Strait situation from top leaders in China following the re-election of President Ma Ying-jeou in 2012, there have been no signs that China’s military posture opposite Taiwan has changed significantly.

The PLA has developed and deployed military capabilities to coerce Taiwan or to attempt an invasion, if necessary. These improvements pose major challenges to Taiwan’s security, which has been based historically upon the PLA’s inability to project power across the 100 nm Taiwan Strait, natural geographic advantages of island defense, Taiwan’s armed forces’ technological superiority, and the possibility of U.S. intervention.

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Information: U.S. Department of State

The State Department was created in 1789, making it the first Executive department established in the United States. It is the lead foreign affairs agency responsible for the international relations of the U.S.
2201 C Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20520
Phone: (202) 647-4000
Website: www.state.gov

Bureau of East Asian & Pacific Affairs (EAP)

The Bureau of East Asian & Pacific Affairs (originally the Office of Chinese Affairs) is charged with advising the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary for Political Affairs on matters concerning the Asia-Pacific Region.

2201 C Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20520
Phone: (202) 647-9596

Office of Taiwan Coordination

The Office of Taiwan Coordination is the equivalent of a country desk for the Republic of China.

2201 C Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20520
Phone: (202) 647-7711

Bureau of Political-Military Affairs

The Bureau of Political-Military Affairs bridges the Department of State with the Department of Defense. It provides policy guidance in the areas of international security, military operations, defense trade, and security assistance. The Bureau is also responsible for coordinating the participation of coalition combat and peacekeeping forces.

2201 C Street, NW
Washington, D.C. 20520
Phone: (202) 647-9022

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Information: U.S. Department of Defense

DoD is the federal department that coordinates and supervises all agencies and function directly related to national security and the armed forces (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps). It is the parent agency for the U.S. military, as well as for several U.S. intelligence agencies. The department is headed by the U.S. Secretary of Defense.

Office of the Secretary of Defense
1000 Defense Pentagon
Washington, D.C. 20301-1000
Phone: (703) 692-7100
Website: www.defense.gov/osd

Asian & Pacific Security Affairs (APSA)

2700 Defense Pentagon, Room 5D688
Washington, DC 20301-2700
Phone: (703) 695-4175
Website: policy.defense.gov/apsa/

Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA)

The DSCA provides financial and technical assistance; transfer of defense materiel, training, and services to allies; and promotes military-to-military contacts. The DSCA’s mission is to lead, direct, and manage security cooperation programs to support U.S. national security objectives that strengthen America’s alliances and partnerships.

2800 Defense Pentagon
Washington, DC 20301-2800
Phone: (703) 601-1646
Email: ipa-web@dsca.mil
Website: www.dsca.mil

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Information: Taiwan Ministry of Economic Affairs

MOEA is the ministry within Taiwan’s government that is tasked with managing the island’s economy. The ministry devotes its efforts not only to guiding Taiwan’s economy through the short-term obstacles it faces, but also to laying a solid foundation for long-term economic growth. Much of the framework that fostered Taiwan’s rapid economic growth was created and implemented by this organization.

15 Fuzhou Street
Taipei 11015, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2321-2200
Email: minister@moea.gov.tw
Website: www.moea.gov.tw

Industrial Development Bureau (IDB)

41-3 Hsin-yi Road, Section 3
Taipei 106, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2754-1255
Email: service@moeaidb.gov.tw
Website: www.moeaidb.gov.tw

Committee for Aviation and Space Industry Development (CASID)

5F, 162-20 Hsin-yi Road, Section 3
Taipei 10658, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2755-6157
Email: jackftang@casid.org.tw
Website: www.casid.org.tw

Industrial Cooperation Program (ICP)

Industrial Cooperation programs, commonly known as “offset” programs, are an obligation imposed on a foreign contractor under a government procurement project, where the contractor agrees to undertake local investment, local procurement, or technology transfer activities amounting to a certain percentage of the overall project. In Taiwan, the Industrial Cooperation Program (ICP) under the Industrial Development Bureau (IDB) within the Ministry of Economic Affairs (MOEA) manages the government’s outstanding offsets.

When Taiwan acceded to the Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA) under the WTO in 2009, it agreed to phase out industrial offset requirements for non-military public procurement. Taiwan therefore fully eliminated offset practices for non-military procurement in 2012. Since 2010, military procurements contracts from Taiwan that exceed the threshold of US$5 million produce offsets requirements, with the minimum offset amount for these contracts at 40%. That ratio can increase beyond 40% – the offset ratio in 2009 reached 70% in several military procurement cases due to legislative pressure.

The Taiwan government, unlike many European governments, does offer multipliers (between 1 and 10, generally), depending on the project. In the Taiwan ICP Office, three working groups manage five categories of offset programs: national defense, aerospace, consumer electronics/computer & communication (3C), transportation & precision machinery, and environmental & biological technology.

Generally speaking, ICP proposals from the foreign contractors is prefered to be consistent with Taiwan Government’s industrial policies as well as the needs of domestic industries. The foreign contractor may choose to carry out any one of, or a combination of, the categories of eligible ICP transactions as described below. Any other ICP transactions that are conducive to the development of domestic industries can be executed upon the approval from the Executive Committee.

1.Technology Transfer

Foreign contractors may transfer technologies to local institutions or companies that are conducive to the development or upgrade of domestic industries. Relevant examples include bogies for the railway vehicles, small turbine engine design, and Photo Inkjet Printer. The credits to be granted for technology transfer will be the sum of the following items: (i) the estimated fair market value of the technology to be transferred multiplied by a factor ranging from one(1) to ten(10); and (ii) the actual direct time-material costs plus other direct costs for the activities of technology transfer, multiplied by a factor ranging from one(1) to ten(10).

2.Research and Development

Foreign contractors may initiate joint R&D projects with local institutions and/or companies or establish R&D centers that are conducive to the development or the upgrade of domestic industries. For example, the development of computerized training for CBT, research on acoustic suppression of fan blade flutter, and the 16G seat development. The credits to be granted for research and development will be the actual direct time-material costs and other actual R&D direct costs shared by the Contractor, multiplied a factor ranging from one(1) to ten(10).

3.Local Investment

Foreign contractors may set up a sole proprietorship or subsidiary in Taiwan or participate in a joint venture with government entities or private companies in Taiwan; for example, the investment in ACX and the investment in Pacific Communications Services Co., Ltd. The credits to be granted for direct local investment will be the amount of the Contractor’s paid-in equity investment, multiplied by a factor ranging from one(1) to ten(10).

4.Training

Foreign contractors may provide personnel training programs to local institutions or companies in engineering, management, operation, examinations, testing as well as services. The FAA test flight pilot training is one such program; and so are the training programs for composite boarded structure fabrication, precision casting of engines, incinerator operation, management and industrial safety technology, quality assurance and certification, and environmental protection, health and safety. The credits to be granted for training will be the sum of the following items: (i) the estimated fair market value of the training to be given, multiplied by a factor ranging from one(1) to five(5); and (ii) the actual direct time-material costs plus other direct costs for the activities of training, multiplied by a factor ranging from one(1) to five(5).

5.International Marketing and Trade Promotion Assistance

Foreign contractors may provide local manufacturers with assistance in international marketing such as market research, market survey, establishment of a price evaluation system, drafting of sales contracts, and expansion of sales channels. In addition, foreign contractors may make unrestricted gifts to independent organizations recognized to be dedicated to expanding and enhancing trade with Taiwan. Through these activities, the competitive edge of local enterprises in the international market is enhanced. Relevant examples include the evaluation of the Asia-Pacific maintenance center, and the manufacture of composite interpolators. The credits to be granted for international marketing assistance will be the actual direct costs incurred by the Contractor for such assistance, multiplied by a factor ranging from one(1) to five(5).

6.Local Procurement

Foreign contractors may procure locally manufactured products designated or approved by the Executive Committee. In principle, locally procured products must be exported; however, products approved by the Executive Committee for use in the procurement projects are not subject to this restriction. Examples of local procurement include purchase of CNC engines, liquid crystal displays, F-16 jet fighter components. The credits to be granted for local procurement will be the sum of value of purchase orders accepted and performed, multiplied by a factor ranging from zero point two five(0.25) to two(2), depending on the technology level required for the product procured.

7.Consortium

Foreign contractors may jointly manage procurement projects with local institutions. The total credits can be deducted in proportion with the actual contract value the local consortium members take, while the execution of key items in the contract scope executed by the local consortium members can apply for eligible ICP projects, subject to the approval of Executive Committee.

8.International certification

Foreign contractors may provide local institutions with assistance in verification, validation or certification for products design, manufacturing, and maintenance, or other relevant document of potential suppliers review.

Sources:
ICP Transaction Categories
U.S. Department of State 2014 Investment Climate Statement

3F, 162-13 Shin-Yi Road, Section 3
Taipei 10658, Taiwan
Phone: (886)2 2754-0266
Email: trudy@icpo.org.tw
Website: www.icpo.org.tw/

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Information: Taiwan Ministry of National Defense

The MND is responsible for formulating military strategy, setting military personnel policies, formulating draft and mobilization plans, delineating supply distribution policies, arranging the research on and development of military technology, compiling the national defense budget, setting military regulations, conducting court martial proceedings, and administering military law. Within the MND is the General Staff Headquarters (GSH), under which are the various services, including the Army, Navy, Air Force, Armed Forces Reserve Command/Coast Guard Command, and Military Police Command. The ministry also has other subordinate agencies such as military academies, military courts, prosecutorial bureaus, and jails, as well as R&D institutions like the Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST).

172 Bo-Ai Road, Jhongjheng District
Taipei 10048, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2311-6117
Email: mnd@mnd.gov.tw
Website: www.mnd.gov.tw/

Army General Headquarters

The Army General Headquarters is responsible for developing and maintaining the Army’s combat power, commanding and supervising all subordinate troops and units. Under its command are the Army Logistics Command, Army Commands, and the Airborne and Special Operations Command. Also under its command are the various Army units.

P.O. Box 90620, Longtan
Taoyuan County, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 3479-2111
Website: army.mnd.gov.tw/

Air Force General Headquarters

The Air Force General Headquarters is responsible for the Air Force’s combat strength and commands and supervises all subordinate troops and units. The units include the Air Force Operations Command, the Air Force Logistics Command, the Air Defense Artillery Command, and various tactical wings.

55 Ren Ai Road, Section 3
Taipei 106, Taiwan

Phone: (886) 2 2711-1101
Website: air.mnd.gov.tw/

Navy General Headquarters

The Navy General Headquarters is in charge of developing and maintaining the Navy’s combat readiness, as well as commanding and supervising its entire subordinate fleets and ground units. Under its command are the Naval Fleet Command, the Marine Corps Headquarters, the Navy Logistics Command, Headquarters of the Naval Area Command, the Area Service Office, the Naval Base Command, and the Bureau of Maritime Survey. The subordinate Navy units are under the direct supervision of the Naval Fleet Command and are organized into the fleet, group, and ship levels. The Marine Corps units, like those of the Army, extend from the Marine Corps Headquarters.

305 Bei-an Road
Taipei 104, Taiwan
Phone: (866) 2 2533-3181
Website: navy.mnd.gov.tw/

Reserve Command

The Reserve Command is the operating body responsible for the control of personnel under reserve status in the Taiwan military. In the event of a crisis is issues the call for active reserves to report for duty.

Taipei City Reserve Command General Headquarters
365 Jinhu Rd., Neihu District
Taipei 114, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2266-9025
Website: afrc.mnd.gov.tw

National Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology (CSIST)

As the leading institution for the research, development, and design of defense technology in Taiwan, CSIST employs some 6,000 scientists and more than 8,000 technicians. CSIST is divided into four major research divisions: aeronautics, missiles, electronics, and chemistry, with six centers for systems development, systems maintenance, quality assurance, materials R&D, aeronautic development, and missile manufacturing. Each research division or research center has a Director in charge of the research and development of its specialty, while planning units have project chairmen responsible for R&D program management and system integration.

CSIST was spun off from the Ministry of National Defense in April of 2014, added “National” to its name, and became NCSIST.

481 Jia-an Section, Zhongzheng Road
Taoyuan County 325, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2673-9638
Website: www.ncsist.org.tw
Email: occso@csnet.gov.tw

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Information: American Institute in Taiwan (AIT)

The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) is a non-profit, private corporation. It was established as part of the Taiwan Relations Act1, and continues to conduct commercial, cultural, and other relations between the United States and Taiwan following the switch in U.S. diplomatic recognition to the PRC in 1979. Funding and operational guidance is provided by the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Congress also provides oversight over AIT’s operations and budget.

U.S. – Taiwan defense relations are handled through AIT’s Technical and Liaison Affairs sections, as well as by the Political/Military Affairs officer stationed in Washington, D.C.

Washington Headquarters Office

1700 North Moore Street, Suite 1700
Arlington, Virginia 22209
Phone: (703) 525-8474
Fax: (703) 841-1385
Web: www.ait.org.tw/en/

Taipei Main Office

No. 7, Lane 134, Hsin Yi Road, Section 3
Taipei 106, Taiwan
Phone: (886) 2 2162-2000
Fax: (886) 2 2162-2251
Web: www.ait.org.tw/en/

Kaohsiung Branch Office

5th Floor, No.2, Chung Cheng 3rd Road
Kaohsiung Taiwan
Phone: (886) (07) 238-7744
Fax: (886) (07) 238-5237
Web: kaohsiung.ait.org.tw

1Public Law 96-8, Taiwan Relations Act (Washington, D.C.: 96th Congress, January 1, 1979)

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